Health, Sports, Fitness

Younger Next Year for Woman

Date Reviewed

Review

'Younger Next Year for Woman' is more than a pronoun change and a pink cover from the original 'Younger Next Year'. That 'more' involves discussion of health issues more particularly related to women with a chapter on menopause.

 

The authors Chris Crowley, a retired lawyer, and Henry Lodge, an M.D., are the same with no addition of a female writer, but that doesn't deny that there is a slightly different orientation, although much of the text, as should be expected, is identical.

 

Younger Next Year: A Guide to Living Like 50 Until You're 80 and Beyond

Date Reviewed

Essentially this book is a kind of 'fountain of youth' manual for those with the discipline to follow it.

 

Not only is the formula designed to lengthen one's life, but maybe more importantly, improve the quality by expanding one's options of activities.

 

It is to change the trajectory of aging from one of progressively steeper decline to one of a gradually descending plateau.

 

Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at any Age

Date Reviewed

Get exercising and work up to 7 or 8 hours weekly is the best way to maintain brain health and stave off Alzheimer's disease and other dementia is Sanjay Gupta's primary recommendation in his book “Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at any Age”.

Forget those over-the-counter memory pills or reliance on mental puzzles and games other than to improve your skill in those areas. Going forward, evolving computer games may provide a breadth of stimulation in exercising the brain, with some hope of replacing drugs, says the author

The Sports Gene:Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance

Date Reviewed

I don't recall ever having read a non-fiction book that was such a page turner. Part of that certainly is my personal interest in the subject, but David Epstein, a senior writer for the magazine Sports Illustrated, has not unexpectedly, a great storytelling knack. He employs it regularly at the outset of every chapter as well as within them to introduce heavier material more painlessly.

 

The Diet Myth:The Real Science Behind What We Eat

Date Reviewed

 

 

You can make your 'own cheese', the 'ultimate selfie', with a swab from your armpit, navel and between your toes for an appropriate microbe sampling to apply to the milk.

 

And if you can get past this idea, the author, Tim Spector, a British professor of genetic epidemiology presents a subtle, comprehensive, imaginative, yet scientific look at a subject that many obsess over, their diet.

 

The Fate of Food: What we'll Eat in a Bigger Hotter, Smarter World

Date Reviewed

 

 

The reader is soon disabused of the idea that 'The Fate of Food: What we'll Eat in a Bigger Hotter, Smarter World' by Amanda Little is about the pros and cons of different menus.

 

In fact it is indirectly about food and really about modern hi-tech agriculture and the twists and turns it could take going forward.

 

The looming pressure effecting it is climate change, particularly heat and disrupted water supply.